Saratoga Springs Marina Pump Station

Secondary Water Facility
City of Saratoga Springs
Marina Park, Saratoga Springs, Utah

Saratoga Springs Marina Pump Station

Introduction

The City of Saratoga Springs, Utah, retained Hansen, Allen & Luce (HAL) to provide design and construction services for a 10,000 gpm irrigation pump station adjacent to Utah Lake. The new project provides water to the City’s growing southern area and allows the City to utilize Utah Lake water rights.

Scope

The $5.4 million project included:

  • Intake structure
  • Submerged tee-style wedge-wire intake screen with air-burst cleaning system
  • 42-inch-diameter intake pipe
  • Concrete wet well
  • Automatic Amiad self-cleaning 200-mesh filters
  • Overhead bridge crane
  • 30-inch-diameter ductile iron discharge piping
  • Four 200-horsepower vertical turbine pumps
  • Space for an additional two future pumps
  • Dredging of the existing marina to provide access during low water levels

Challenge

The City needed to provide irrigation water to residents in its southern area. Evan after metering and conservation efforts, existing secondary water sources—mostly canals and pipelines from the north—were insufficient to keep up with development. In a recent master plan, HAL had recommended a local lakeside pump station to serve this part of the City. The pump station needed to be flexible to meet both existing and future needs with a reliable secondary water source.

Solution/Result

HAL designed a submerged intake, intake pipeline, pump station, and discharge facilities on a shoreline site in Marina Park. Construction began in December 2016 by COP Construction and was substantially completed in June 2017. Dredging, site restoration, and miscellaneous items were completed in October 2017. Current pumping capacity is 5,000 gpm, expandable to 10,000 gpm with future equipment.

The withdrawal of water directly from Utah Lake (rather than the downstream Jordan River and its canals) bypasses 15 miles of open channels and avoids seepage and evaporation losses that would occur along the way.

The project was named the 2018 Civil/Public Works Project of the Year by the Associated General Contractors of Utah.