Presentations & Publications

Survey of Energy Requirements for Public Water Supply in the United States

July 2017 | Robert B. Sowby and Steven J. Burian (University of Utah)

National studies on drinking water systems’ energy requirements are sparse, and only limited empirical data have been available. This study adds considerable spatial and temporal detail to better characterize the requirements of 109 water systems in the continental United States.

Journal – American Water Works Association 109 (7): E20–E30

Hydraulic Modeling Finds, Fixes Chlorine Residual Gaps

June 2017 | Kayson M. Shurtz, Steven C. Jones, Robert B. Sowby, Daniel 'K' Woodbury (Riverton City), and D. Scott Hill (Riverton City)

After switching from wells to surface water, Riverton, Utah, experienced elevated levels of adenosine triphosphate in its water system. Hydraulic modeling helped solve the problem.

Opflow 43 (6): 28–30

Saratoga Springs: A Case Study of Installing Secondary Water Meters

2016 | Gordon Miner (Saratoga Springs) and Steve Jones

In 2012, when Saratoga Springs found that residents were using more than twice as much water as the system was designed for, the city decided to install meters on every connection. Although the process had its share of issues and complications, the results have been dramatic. Even before the metered usage showed up on the bill, the water use dropped significantly. By the time a rate restructuring took place and the usage actually affected the bill, most residents were already using the right amount of water.

American Water Works Association, Intermountain Section, Annual Conference

Web Applications to Support Municipal Water Works

2016 | Nathan Swain (Aquaveo) and Steve Jones

The interactive and intuitive nature of web apps makes them an excellent medium for creating decision support tools that harness cutting-edge modeling techniques and promote the work of engineers. We demonstrate how Tethys Platform has been applied to develop a web app that uses EPANET to simulate, visualize, and optimize water distribution systems. We discuss the pros and cons of using web apps to support municipal water works and illustrate with lessons we have learned while developing the EPANET app.

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American Water Works Association

Water System Optimization: Aligning Energy Efficiency, Water Quality, and System Performance

2016 | Steven C. Jones and Robert B. Sowby

Water system optimization makes municipal water services more sustainable. Learn about the energy requirements of public water supply and to implement best practices to address energy efficiency, water quality, and system performance. These three parameters do not always compete with each other but can balance to produce productive synergies.

American Water Works Association, California-Nevada Section, Annual Fall Conference

Energy Management in the Water Sector: A Major Sustainability Opportunity

2016 | Robert B. Sowby

Energy management in the water sector is an untapped sustainability opportunity with financial, environmental, and social benefits. Research and case studies demonstrate that energy reductions of 10% to 30% are typical for water utilities that pursue efficiency. Such solutions are cost-effective, prompt, and synergistic.

The 1st International Electronic Conference on Water Sciences

City of West Jordan Storm Drain Master Plan Dynamic Model

2015 | Joseph G. Hawkes

This presentation shows the benefits and constraints of dynamic storm drain modeling. Using West Jordan, Utah, as a case study, it describes model requirements, data, automated delineation with high-resolution LiDAR, model compilation, and problem solving.

American Public Works Association, Utah Chapter, Fall Conference

Dam Break Inundation Area Modeling and Mapping for an Emergency Action Plan

2015 | Benjamin D. Miner

The dam is failing. Now what? Emergency planning for dam breaks requires inundation maps to show what areas will be affected. This presentation describes regulations, methods, and models for preparing inundation maps in the context of Emergency Action Plans.

American Public Works Association, Utah Chapter, Fall Conference

Energy Intensity of Utah Water Utilities: Results of a 2015 Study

2015 | Robert B. Sowby

Water services require significant amounts of energy, and energy is typically a water utility’s largest controllable cost. While good data exist for other states, Utah’s position is relatively unknown. A 2015 study, the first of its kind in Utah, collected and analyzed energy data from dozens of water and wastewater utilities throughout the state. This presentation summarizes the study’s results and discusses some of the data issues encountered during the study.

American Water Works Association, Intermountain Section, Annual Conference

Compliance Strategies for High Levels of Arsenic, Nitrates, and Other Constituents in Groundwater

2015 | Benjamin D. Miner

Groundwater is a major source of safe and clean drinking water for most public water systems. However, many otherwise great sources are plagued with high levels of arsenic, nitrates, or other constituents regulated by primary drinking water standards. This presentation addresses sampling and treatment strategies, with discussion of the relative complexity and costs of implementation. Case studies are also discussed.

American Water Works Association, Intermountain Section, Annual Conference

Well Reconditioning

2015 | William S. Bigelow

Over time, water wells wear out. Sand production, biofouling, casing failures, and decreased yield are common problems. Reconditioning can restore a well to its original performance for much less than drilling a new well.

American Water Works Association, Intermountain Section, Annual Conference

Logan, Utah: A Case Study in Water and Energy Efficiency

2015 | Steven C. Jones, Paul W. Lindhardt, and Robert B. Sowby

Logan City, Utah, optimized its water system for both water and energy efficiency. Results include 32% energy savings, 17% water use reduction, and 40% fewer mainline breaks.

Journal - American Water Works Association 107 (8): 72–75

Quantifying Energy Use in the U.S. Public Water Industry: A Summary

2014 | Steven C. Jones and Robert B. Sowby

This article summarizes previous and recent research on the energy requirements of public water and wastewater services in the United States and briefly discusses some tools and resources for engineers working in this field. The intent is to inform industry professionals in order to better manage both water and energy resources.

Currents (Environmental & Water Resources Institute, American Society of Civil Engineers) 16 (4): 6–9

Individual Booster Pumps: Low Pressure Solution or Compliance Problem

2014 | Benjamin D. Miner

When a homeowner wants more pressure than a public water system can provide, an individual booster pump may be an option. This presentation describes the problems, solutions, risks, and regulations surrounding individual home booster pumps.

American Water Works Association, Intermountain Section, Annual Conference

Deep Drilling for Groundwater Yields Rewards

2014 | David E. Hansen

The Central Utah Water Conservancy District took a unique approach to discover new water for a growing population, with better-than-expected results. This is believed to be the largest single groundwater development project undertaken in Utah.

Water Online

Water System Optimization: Aligning Energy Efficiency, System Performance, and Water Quality

June 2014 | Steven C. Jones and Robert B. Sowby

Operational improvements identified through an optimization study can bring the system into a balance that achieves cost savings through energy efficiency, greater system performance and reliability, and improved water quality—with no capital expenses.

Journal – American Water Works Association 106 (6): 66–71

Master Planning Your Water System: Five Benefits and a Case Study

May 2014 | Steven C. Jones and Robert B. Sowby

Water, wastewater, and stormwater systems are vital to keep cities functioning. The public relies on them to supply clean water, remove waste, and prevent flooding. Master planning can help system managers provide these critical services more reliably.

Water Environment & Technology 26 (5): 30–32

Sandy City Storm Drain Model Update

2014 | Joseph G. Hawkes

This presentation describes the development of a new SWMM storm drain model for Sandy City, Utah. The project updated a previous model that overpredicted flows and didn’t accurately represent subbasins. Of note was the batch calculation of composite subbasin attributes.